Addresses

Assemblymember Shirley Weber: Celebrate Black History Month by Honoring Unsung Heroes

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SACRAMENTO – In this week's Democratic radio address, Assemblymember Shirley Weber (D-San Diego), Chair of the Assembly Budget Subcommittee on Health and Human Services and member of the California Legislative Black Caucus, discusses the importance of honoring unsung heroes of the Civil Rights Movement as California marks Black History Month. In particular, Assemblymember Weber notes the significant contributions of Annetta Kelly Lawrence, Alice Allison Dunnigan, and Harold K. Brown, and urges Californians to learn about others who have played a role in the struggle for equality.

This week's radio address is 2:27.

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Assemblymember Rob Bonta: Assembly Democrats to Work Toward Solution for CalSTRS Funding Liability this Year

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SACRAMENTO – In this week's Democratic Radio Address, Assemblymember Rob Bonta (D-Oakland) discusses the unfunded liability facing the California State Teachers' Retirement System and announces that the Assembly Committee on Public Employees, Retirement and Social Security will be hosting a series of public hearings to create a funding plan.

This week's radio address is 3:08

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Assemblymember Anthony Rendon: Assembly Working on California Water Crisis

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SACRAMENTO – In this week’s Democratic Radio Address, Assemblymember Anthony Rendon (D-Lakewood) discusses California’s drought crisis and the Assembly water bond, which will include funding storage projects that will help protect California in the event of a future drought. Assemblymember Rendon has put forth Assembly Bill 1331, the Clean and Safe Drinking Water Act of 2014, putting the Assembly’s water bond on the November 2014 ballot.

This week’s radio address is 2:27.
mp3

Transcript:

Announcer:
“This is the Democratic weekly address from the Assembly Democratic Caucus.”

Assemblymember Anthony Rendon:
“This is Assemblymember Anthony Rendon.

California’s water system serves over 30 million people and irrigates 6 million acres of farmland.

2013 became the driest year on record in California. Almost 99% of California is considered abnormally dry or worse…almost two-thirds of the state is in extreme drought. Our Sierra snow packs that deliver a third of our fresh water are only one-tenth to one-fifth of normal.

Even without a drought, experts believe that we will be short 2 trillion gallons of water per year by 2020.

Many parts of our water infrastructure are well beyond design life and need upgrading or replacement. Federal water quality standards are not being met on over half of California's 3 million acres of lakes, bays, wetlands and estuaries. 30,000 miles of the state’s shoreline, streams and rivers do not meet federal water quality goals. 

Right now there are many places in California where residents rely on bottled water because their water is not safe to drink.  

The water crisis also threatens California’s multi-billion dollar agricultural industry that relies on 80% of the state’s water supply. 

The aquifers in the Central Valley that serve millions of acres of farms are dangerously close to collapsing as a result of overuse and contamination.

Our efforts to protect our water, our residents, and our economy must include passing a responsible water bond.

That is why the state Assembly has spent the last year developing a new water bond. 
We’ve convened 8 public hearings throughout the state to hear from Californians about what they need in their communities. 

From these hearings, we’ve written a water bond based on a clear set of principles and a framework to responsibly guide our spending priorities, increase accountability, and equally address the needs of communities across the state.

As a result, we have a cleaner and more affordable water bond that is finely tailored to meet the needs of every region in the state.

This bond includes funding for improving drinking water quality, protecting rivers and watersheds, improving the reliability of clean water delivery, protecting the state’s Delta water system, and funding storage projects that will protect us from future droughts.

Assembly Bill 1331 is awaiting action in the State Senate. California needs this critical and fair water bond before the voters in November.

I’m Assemblymember Anthony Rendon.

Thank you for listening.”

Website of Assemblymember Anthony Rendon: http://asmdc.org/members/a63/

CONTACT: Bill Wong (916) 319-2063

Assemblymember Shirley Weber: New Assembly Committee will Work to Ensure Campus Climate is Safe and Welcoming

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SACRAMENTO – In this week's Democratic radio address, Assemblymember Shirley Weber (D-San Diego), Chair of the Assembly Select Committee on Campus Climate discusses the disturbing incident at San Jose State University last fall that spurred the Assembly to create the new committee that will examine the current climate at California colleges and universities so the legislature can consider what policy changes may be necessary to ensure all students feel safe and welcome. On the eve of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Assemblymember Weber also notes that we must all take the opportunity to celebrate the life of Dr. King by recommitting ourselves to carrying forward his vision.

This week's radio address is 2:18. mp3

Transcript:

Announcer:
“This is the Democratic weekly address from the Assembly Democratic Caucus.”

Assemblymember Shirley Weber:
“This is Assemblymember Shirley Weber.

Before coming to the legislature, I was a faculty member and department chair at San Diego State University for over forty years.

My impetus for coming to Sacramento was to restore the promise of our public colleges and universities by ensuring access and affordability for all students who want to attend.

But recent incidents on California Campuses remind us that we also need to ensure that – once students arrive on campus – they are welcomed, respected and safe – whatever their background.

One of the most disturbing incidents – one that harkens back to an uglier time in our nation’s history – occurred on the campus of San Jose State University just last fall.

Four white students are accused of assault and hate crimes against an African-American student after repeatedly harassing him, barricading him in his room and locking a bicycle lock around his neck and pretending to lose the key.

This was accompanied by the use of racial insults, Nazi signs and a Confederate flag.

As a parent sending my child away to college, I would want to know that my son or daughter is safe. As a student, I would want to know that my school will provide a welcoming and supportive climate.

To address these concerns, Speaker John A. Pérez has appointed me to chair the Assembly Select Committee on Campus Climate.

In upcoming months, my subcommittee colleagues and I will be holding a series of public hearings to examine the current campus climate for students throughout the CSU, UC and community college systems, and to consider what policy changes might be necessary to improve it.

This weekend our country honors Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. We must take this opportunity to celebrate the life of Dr. King and recommit ourselves to carrying forward his vision for a country of success, prosperity and justice for all our people.

Please check my website in upcoming weeks for details about upcoming hearings.

This is Assemblymember Shirley Weber.

Thank you for your time.”

Website of Assemblymember Shirley Weber: www.asmdc.org/Weber

Asambleísta Shirley Weber: Nuevo Comité de la Asamblea Trabajará para Asegurar que el Ambiente en los Campuses sea Seguro y Acogedor

SACRAMENTO – En el mensaje demócrata semanal, la asambleísta Shirley Weber (D-San Diego), presidenta del Comité Selecto Sobre el Ambiente en los Campuses comenta sobre el perturbador incidente que ocurrió en la Universidad estatal de San Jose el otoño pasado que incentive a la Asamblea a crear un nuevo comité que examinara el ambiente actual de las universidades y colegios de California para que así la Legislatura pueda considerar cuales son las políticas de cambio necesarias para asegurar que los estudiantes se sientan seguros y acogidos.  En la víspera del día del Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., la asambleísta destaca que debemos tomar conjuntamente esta oportunidad para celebrar la vida del Dr. King y renovar nuestro compromiso de llevar hacia adelante su visión.

 

El discurso radial en archivo de MP3 puede ser localizado en el sitio de Internet. Tiempo de duración es 2:59. mp3

MENSAJE RADIAL:

“Les habla la asambleísta Shirley Weber.

Antes de llegar a la Legislatura, por más de cuarenta años fui académica y decano de un departamento en la Universidad estatal de San Diego.

Mi ímpetu de venir a Sacramento fue para restaurar la promesa de nuestras universidades públicas de asegurar el acceso y el costo a todos los estudiantes que deseen asistir a ellas.

Pero los recientes incidentes en los campuses de California nos recuerda que también debemos asegurar que – una vez que nuestros estudiantes arriban en los campuses – ellos deben sentirse bienvenidos, respetados y seguros – cualquiera sea su procedencia.

Uno de los incidentes más perturbadores – es uno que nos lleva de vuelta a un lugar oscuro en el tiempo de nuestra historia nacional – y ocurrió en el campus de la universidad estatal de San Jose  el otoño pasado.

Cuatro estudiantes blancos fueron acusados de asalto y crímenes de odio en contra de un estudiante afroamericano después de haberlo acosado repetidamente, encerrado en su dormitorio y puesto una cadena de bicicleta alrededor de su cuello, pretendiendo que habían perdido la llave.

Esto fue acompañado por insultos raciales, símbolos Nazis y una bandera de los confederados del sur.

Como cualquier padre que envía a su hijo o hija a una universidad lejana, desearía saber si mi hija o hijo están a salvo. Como estudiante, desearía saber que la universidad proporciona una bienvenida y un clima de respaldo.

Para tratar estas preocupaciones, el presidente de la Asamblea John Pérez me ha nombrado presidenta del comité selecto sobre el clima en los campuses.

En los próximos meses, los colegas que integran el subcomité y su servidora llevaremos a cabo audiencias públicas para examinar el actual clima en las universidades para los estudiantes en los sistemas de CSU, UC y colegios comunitarios, para considerar que políticas deben implementarse para mejorar la situación.

Esta semana nuestra nación honra al Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., y nosotros debemos tomar esta oportunidad para celebrar la vida del Dr. King y volver a comprometernos a seguir adelante con su visión para construir un país exitoso, próspero y con justicia para todos sus habitantes.

Por favor visite mi sitio Web en las siguientes semanas para encontrar los detalles de las próximas audiencias públicas.

Gracias por su atención.

Les habló la asambleísta Shirley Weber.”

Portal del presidente de la asambleísta Weber: http://asmdc.org/weber

CONTACT: John Vigna (916) 319-2408

 

 

Speaker John A. Pérez Discusses End of Legislative Session

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SACRAMENTO – In this week’s Democratic Radio Address, Speaker John A. Pérez (D-Los Angeles) speaks to the Assembly on the last night of the legislative session. Speaker Pérez highlights some of the Assembly’s accomplishments during the 2013 session, including passing legislation to expand healthcare to over a million Californians who are otherwise uninsured, passing an on-time balanced budget for the third year in a row and passing the Middle Class Scholarship, which effectively reduces fees at California public universities by up to 40 percent.

This week's address is 1:37http://www.asmdc.org/audio/20130912RadioAddressEndOfSessionPerez.mp3"> mp3

Transcript:

Announcer:
“This is the Democratic Weekly Address from the Assembly Democratic Caucus.”

Speaker John A. Pérez:
“After years of weathering the Great Recession, California is clearly on a comeback trail, thanks in large part to the members of the Legislature.

In this first year of our two-year session we passed an on-time balanced budget for the third year in a row. The first time that’s happened in 30 years.

We passed major bills on a variety of important topics, including expanding access to health care, dealing with broad based issues of economic development, working together to improve the business climate of the state, supporting our veterans and enacting Middle Class Scholarship.

I believe that history and the record will show we were clearly focused on maintaining fiscal responsibility, increasing prosperity and opportunity, and investing in California’s future.

But as this first year of the session comes to an end, we know there is a lot more work that we must do together.

We must continue to help California’s economy recover, and we must continue to look for ways to help middle class families, and we must help provide a path for those Californians working to become self-sufficient and join the middle class.”

Website of Speaker John A. Pérez: http://asmdc.org/speaker

Assemblymember Jose Medina: California is on Track to Economic Recovery, Work Still to be Done

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SACRAMENTO – In this Democratic weekly radio address, Assemblymember Jose Medina (D-Riverside), Chair of the Assembly Jobs, Economic Development and Economy Committee, discusses improving California’s economic climate. According to a recent Economic Development Department report, California has the longest monthly job growth streak in the nation, with the state adding jobs 25 months in a row. Assemblymember Medina credits the improving conditions to the Assembly Democrats’ commitment to fiscal responsibility while investing in programs that encourage prosperity. He says that if the state continues on this path, California will continue to see job growth.

This week's address is 2:03
mp3

Transcript:

“Hi, I’m Assemblymember Jose Medina, chair of the Assembly Jobs, Economic Development, and the Economy Committee.

This week California got some positive economic news in a new report from the state’s Economic Development Department.

According to the EDD, California employers have added jobs for 25 months in a row, the longest job creation streak in the nation, with a total gain of more than 807-thousand since February 2010.

Because of our rebounding housing market and the easing of budget constraints on state and local governments, the EDD predicts this job growth will continue.

That’s one more sign that after several tough years of weathering the Great Recession, Assembly Democrats are committed to maintaining fiscal responsibility, working to increase prosperity, and investing in California’s future.

The results of our efforts are clear.

We have passed a balanced and on-time budget for the past three years, with surpluses in sight.

Unemployment in California was 8.7% in July. One year earlier, it was 10.6%.

Two credit agencies have raised the state’s credit rating, saving the state half a billion dollars in debt financing payments.

Our economy has moved up once again to be ranked eighth globally, according to the Center for the Continuing Study of the California Economy.

Our economy is growing faster than 44 other states, and our revenues have rebounded better than all but one.

California is on the right track, but our job isn’t over yet.

An even better economy is on the horizon if we continue maintaining fiscal responsibility, working to increase prosperity, and investing in California’s future to ensure every Californian has an opportunity to succeed and contribute to our recovery.

This is Assemblymember Jose Medina, thank you for listening.”

Website of Assemblymember Jose Medina: www.asmdc.org/Medina

Speaker John A. Pérez: Prison Proposal Will Protect Californians

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SACRAMENTO – In this Democratic weekly radio address, Speaker John A. Pérez (D-Los Angeles) speaks at a press conference with Governor Jerry Brown, Senate and Assembly Republican leaders and public safety officials to announce legislation that complies with a federal court order to limit state prison population to 137.5 percent of capacity, avoids the early release of thousands of prisoners and protects public safety. The legislation will immediately expand prison capacity and require the state to develop long-term solutions with stakeholders to address capacity needs, prison population levels and recidivism rate. A federal court has ordered California to comply by December 31, 2013 with a cap on the number of inmates in state prisons.

This week’s address is 2:31
mp3

Transcript:

“Thank you Governor. I’m pleased to join with the Governor, with the Republican Leaders of the Assembly and Senate, Mrs. Conway and Mr. Huff, as well as Sheriffs, Police Chiefs, District Attorneys, Probation Officers, public safety advocates, Local Government representatives and crime victim advocates who have joined us today to discuss how California will achieve the Court’s mandated target of 137.5% capacity of our prison system.

The Governor and I have consistently expressed—in the strongest possible terms—that we believe that the Court is fundamentally wrong in spelling out what it believes our priorities should be—either in the release of 10,000 additional inmates, or costly interventions that impact our reserve.

Our obligation to the people of California is clear: public safety is of the utmost importance, and we will not do a single thing that would put us in the position of releasing an additional, single prisoner.

The work that all of us in the legislature have done with the Governor to stabilize our financial situation and to build a strong reserve gives us the flexibility to meet the target that the courts have set, and we will do so.

What we’re unveiling today is the beginning of the process, a plan that will be fully vetted through a committee process and ultimately through votes in both houses of the legislature.

We will also, as the Governor said, simultaneously begin a much, much broader, comprehensive policy discussion on how to address the long-term challenges of the prison system.

In the Assembly I’ll be appointing an Assembly Select Committee to guide this process, and we’re committed to work with the Governor and with our colleagues in the Senate to bring together state and national experts who can evaluate all of the options available to us from an outcome-based perspective.

We’ll examine issues directly tied to the prison population, like reviewing sentencing guidelines, as well as broader policy questions that prevent crime in the first place. We will look at impacts on all measures of things, but first we start with the immediate challenge.

The plan we’re unveiling today meets the Court’s targets, and begins the crucial discussion, and moves us to pass the plan before we adjourn session in the next few weeks.”

Website of Speaker John A. Pérez: http://asmdc.org/speaker

Presidente John A. Pérez: La Propuesta Sobre el Sistema Penal Protegerá a los Californianos

SACRAMENTO – En el mensaje demócrata semanal, el presidente de la Asamblea John A. Pérez (D- Los Angeles), participa en una conferencia de prensa junto al gobernador Jerry Brown, líderes republicanos de la Asamblea y del Senado y funcionarios de seguridad pública para anunciar la legislación que cumple con el mandato de la corte federal la cual limita la población penal hasta un 137.5 por ciento de su capacidad, evita la liberación temprana de miles de reclusos y protege la seguridad pública. La legislación expandirá inmediatamente la capacidad penal y exige que el Estado desarrolle un plan de largo plazo con las partes interesadas para tratar el tema de la capacidad, nivel de población penal y los niveles de reincidencia. Una corte federal ordeno a California a cumplir con la ley para el 31 de diciembre de 2013 sobre el límite en el número de reclusos en las prisiones estatales.

El discurso radial en archivo de MP3 puede ser localizado en el sitio de Internet. Tiempo de duración es: 3:08
mp3

MENSAJE RADIAL:

“¡Gracias gobernador! Me siento muy complacido de acompañar al gobernador, a los líderes republicanos de la Asamblea y del Senado, la señora Conway y el señor Huff, como también a los sheriffs, jefes de departamentos de policías, fiscales, agentes de libertad vigilada, defensores de la seguridad pública, representantes de los gobiernos locales y defensores de las víctimas del crimen las cuales nos acompañan para conversar de cómo California puede cumplir con el mandato de la corte de disminuir la sobrepoblación de nuestras prisiones que se encuentran en un 137.5%  por sobre la capacidad.

El gobernador y su servidor hemos expresado constantemente—y en los términos más fuertes posibles—que nosotros creemos que la corte esta fundamentalmente incorrecta en su percepción de cuales deberían ser nuestras prioridades—ya sea en la liberación de 10,000 prisioneros adicionales, o las costosas intervenciones que tendrán un efecto en nuestras reservas.

Nuestra obligación con los residentes de California es clara: la seguridad pública la de mayor importancia, y no haremos nada que nos ponga en la posición de tener que liberar a un prisionero adicional.

El trabajo que todos hemos hecho en la Legislatura con el gobernador para estabilizar nuestra situación financiera y crear una reserva solida nos da la flexibilidad de alcanzar la meta que la corte nos han impuesto, y lo haremos.

Lo que estamos presentando el día de hoy es el comienzo de un proceso, un plan que será cuidadosamente analizado mediante el proceso de un comité y últimamente por intermedio de los votos de ambas cámaras de la Legislatura.

También, como ya lo menciono el gobernador, simultáneamente comenzaremos una discusión política más amplia y completa para poder lidiar con los desafíos de largo plazo del sistema de prisiones.

En la Asamblea nombraré un comité selecto que guie el proceso, y nosotros tenemos el compromiso de trabajar con el gobernador y nuestros colegas en el Senado para que en conjunto invitemos a expertos estatales y nacionales para que puedan evaluar las opciones disponibles que tenemos al alcance desde el punto de vista de una perspectiva basada en resultados.

Nosotros examinaremos los temas ligados directamente a la población penal, tal como la revisión de las guías para las  sentencias, y preguntas globales sobre las políticas que previenen el crimen en primer lugar. Nosotros revisaremos el impacto en todas sus instancias, pero primero comenzaremos con el desafío que tenemos enfrente.

El plan que presentamos el día de hoy cumple con los requisitos de la corte, y da comienzo a una discusión crucial y nos empuja a aprobar el plan antes de que la Legislatura levante la sesión en las próximas semanas.”

Portal del presidente de la Asamblea John A. Pérez: www.asmdc.org/speaker

Assemblymember Shirley Weber Commemorates the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

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SACRAMENTO – In this week’s Democratic Radio Address, Assemblymember Shirley Weber (D-San Diego) commemorates the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, organized by a coalition of civil rights, labor, and religious organizations and attended by 250,000 people. On August 28, the California Assembly will mark the anniversary, and members of the California Legislative Black Caucus will host events commemorating this landmark event in the struggle for civil rights and equality in America.

This week's radio address is 2:18. mp3

Transcript:

“Hello, I’m Assemblymember Shirley Weber.

August 28th marks the 50th anniversary of the monumental moment in American history when Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his famous “I Have a Dream Speech” on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Organized by a coalition of civil rights activist, labor, and religious organizations, the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom was attended by about 250,000 supporters.

In addition to a means to demonstrate the support for civil rights legislation proposed by then President John F. Kennedy, the historic march was utilized to demand equal access to public accommodations, a law against racial discrimination in the workplace, and an end to disenfranchisement.

On August 28th 2013, Members of the California Legislative Black Caucus (CLBC) and I will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, D.C. for Jobs and Freedom at the State Capitol.

We will host two events which will focus on how “The Great March on Washington” served as a catalyst for the passage of landmark reforms such as the voting and civil rights acts.

The events will also explore topics relating to equal opportunity.

The informational briefing will take place from 10am-12pm in State Capitol Room 126 and the rally will take place from 12pm-1pm on the Capitol South Steps.

During the informational briefing attendees will have the opportunity hear researchers present historical and contemporary data detailing progress, impediments, and opportunities moving forward.

The rally will feature speeches from policymakers and political leaders reflecting on the day’s history and preparing for the future.

The March on Washington DC for Jobs and Freedom illustrated a massive public outcry for equal opportunity, genuine respect, and basic humanity for those crippled by the shackles of oppression that shattered the American dream and promise that our founding fathers embedded in the U.S. Constitution.

It is imperative that we do not only commemorate the March on Washington for its cultural and historical significance, but we must also aim to fulfill its promise moving forward.

This has been Assemblymember Shirley Weber. Thank you for listening.”

Website of Assemblymember Shirley Weber: www.asmdc.org/Weber

Asambleísta Shirley Weber Conmemora el 50 Aniversario de la Marcha en Washington

SACRAMENTO – En el mensaje demócrata semanal, la asambleísta Shirley Weber (D-San Diego) conmemora el 50 aniversario de la marcha en Washington, en el cual el Dr.

Martin Luther King, Jr. leyó su gran discurso “I Have a Dream.” El 28 de agosto, los miembros del Comité Parlamentario Afroamericano de California rendirá un homenaje a este histórico aniversario por los derechos civiles y la igualdad, y patrocinarán dos eventos enfocados en cómo esta marcha influyó en la historia de la nación y la legislación.

El discurso radial en archivo de MP3 puede ser localizado en el sitio de Internet. Tiempo de duración es 2:59. mp3

MENSAJE RADIAL:

“¡Qué tal! Les habla la asambleísta Shirley Weber.

El 28 de agosto marca la fecha del 50 aniversario del grandioso momento en la historia estadounidense cuando el reverendo Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. leyera su famoso discurso “I Have a Dream” en las escalinatas del monumento a Lincoln en Washington, D.C.

Organizada por una coalición de activistas de los derechos civiles, del trabajo, y organizaciones religiosas, asistieron a la marcha en Washington por empleo y libertad alrededor de  250,000 personas.

Además de demostrar respaldo por la legislación de derechos civiles propuestas en ese entonces por el presidente John F. Kennedy, la histórica marcha también fue utilizada para demandar acceso igualitario a las comodidades públicas, una ley en contra de la discriminación racial en los puestos de trabajo, y poner fin a la marginación.

El 28 de agosto de 2013, los miembros del Comité Parlamentario Afroamericano de California y su servidora conmemoraremos el 50 aniversario de la Marcha en Washington, D.C. por trabajo y libertad en el Capitolio Estatal.

Patrocinaremos dos eventos los cuales se enfocarán en cómo “La Gran Marcha en Washington” sirvió de catalizador para la aprobación de reformas históricas tales como la del derecho al voto y los derechos civiles.

El evento también explorará los temas relacionados a la igualdad de oportunidades.

La sesión informativa se llevará a cabo de 10 de la mañana al mediodía en el salón 126 del Capitolio y la concentración comenzará del mediodía hasta la una de la tarde en las escalinatas del sector sur del Capitolio.

Durante la sesión informativa, los asistentes tendrán la oportunidad de escuchar a investigadores presentar los datos históricos y contemporáneos que detallan el progreso, impedimentos, y oportunidades en el futuro.

El mitin presenta discursos de varios diseñadores de políticas públicas y líderes políticos que reflexionarán sobre la historia de hoy y la preparación para el futuro.

La marcha en Washington DC por trabajo y libertad ilustra una masiva protesta pública por igualdad de condiciones, respeto genuino, y humanidad básica para aquellos incapacitados por las cadenas de la opresión que destruían el sueño americano y la promesa que nuestros padres de la patria  encarnaron en la constitución de los Estados Unidos.

Es de suma importancia no solamente conmemorar la marcha en Washington por su significado cultural e histórico, pero nosotros debemos apuntar a que esa promesa sea cumplida lo antes posible.

Gracias por su atención. Les habló la asambleísta Shirley Weber.”

Portal del presidente de la asambleísta Weber: http://asmdc.org/weber

CONTACT: John Vigna (916) 319-2408

Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal: Wireless Emergency Alert System Saves Lives

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(Sacramento) – In this Democratic weekly radio address, Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal (D-Long Beach), Vice Chair of the Joint Legislative Committee on Emergency Management, urges Californians not to opt out of the Wireless Emergency Alert system (WEA), and reminds people that WEA goes beyond Amber Alerts—they are necessary for warning Californians of natural disasters and terrorist attacks.

A full transcript is below. This week's address is 3:25. mp3

Website of Assemblymember Lowenthal: http://asmdc.org/lowenthal

Transcript:

“Hello.  I’m Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal, Vice Chair of the Joint Legislative Committee on Emergency Management.

Last week, many of us in the West witnessed an innovative program in action. 

Thankfully, with the broad distribution of an Amber Alert through the new Wireless Emergency Alert system, otherwise known as WEA, we were able to avoid further tragedy, and Hannah Anderson is home safely with her father.

Without a doubt, this system has the potential to save lives here in California and across the nation. 

Whether it’s a wildfire, earthquake, terrorist attack, or an Amber Alert, Wireless Emergency Alerts may make all the difference. 

This is California and we’re not strangers to natural disasters.  We’ve seen some of the worst.

We also know all too well from experience that minutes matter.  Like other states, we’ve been working to develop systems that give people an early warning of a potential disaster. 

One of our biggest challenges is finding the right technology that gets critical information to a targeted area as quickly as possible.

Our existing programs like reverse 9-1-1 can only do so much.  They depend in large part on land lines, and having someone around to answer that phone. 

That’s exactly why we need the WEA system.  It provides a reliable, flexible, and comprehensive system to alert people during a severe emergency.

It can target alerts to a certain geographic area – sending the message to all cell phones within that area.  It’s not hindered by blocked lines.  And, it’s free.

Anyone who purchased a phone since the end of 2012 has the ability to receive alerts issued from FEMA and local emergency managers through WEA.  The technology is already pre-installed.

Keep in mind, this program goes beyond Amber Alerts. 

It can distribute warnings on tornadoes, tsunamis, wildfires, and other natural disasters. 

It can be used for a presidential alert to warn us about an act of war, or a terrorist attack.

It will also distribute critical messages after disasters. For example the location of shelters, open roads, and open hospitals.

Yes, last week’s alert was loud.  It may have startled you.  It’s designed, in fact, to get your attention.  If there’s a wildfire approaching your neighborhood, you’re going to want know about it.

I hope all Californians understand the tremendous potential this program has to save lives and protect property.  I hope you’ll think twice before disabling the alerts on your phone. 

I’m Bonnie Lowenthal.  Thank you for listening.”

CONTACT: Allison Ruff, (916) 319-2070

Assemblymember Fox Applauds Gov. Brown for Signing Legislation on Economic Development to Help Improve Business in California

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March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom
50th Anniversary
August 28, 2013


On August 28, 1963, over 250,000 people descended the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to demand social justice and equality for all Americans. Known as the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, the march was the largest civil rights rally in American history and drew national attention to the Civil Rights Movement. It is often credited with influencing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965. Numerous activists, religious leaders, politicians and citizens labored to organize the march, which required extensive planning. Among the speakers was Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. whose “I Have a Dream” speech culminated the event and inspired millions to pursue social justice. The speech inspires civil rights leaders to this day and is cited as one of the greatest speeches in our nation’s history. In recognition of this historic day, the Smithsonian has produced an “Oral History of the March on Washington,” featuring photographs and interviews with some of the march’s organizers and attendees. Click here to read more.

Transcript:

"I Have A Dream"

by Martin Luther King, Jr.

Delivered on the steps at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. on August 28, 1963.

Source: teachingamericanhistory.org

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity. But one hundred years later, we must face the tragic fact that the Negro is still not free.

One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land.

So we have come here today to dramatize an appalling condition. In a sense we have come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir.

This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check which has come back marked "insufficient funds." But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation.

So we have come to cash this check -- a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to open the doors of opportunity to all of God's children. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment and to underestimate the determination of the Negro. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights.

The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges. But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. we must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.

The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny and their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.

We cannot walk alone. And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, "When will you be satisfied?" we can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro's basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair. I say to you today, my friends, that in spite of the difficulties and frustrations of the moment, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal." I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slaveowners will be able to sit down together at a table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a desert state, sweltering with the heat of injustice and oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day the state of Alabama, whose governor's lips are presently dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, will be transformed into a situation where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers. I have a dream today. I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together. This is our hope. This is the faith with which I return to the South. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with a new meaning, "My country, 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim's pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring." And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania! Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado! Let freedom ring from the curvaceous peaks of California! But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia! Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee! Let freedom ring from every hill and every molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, "Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!"